April Research Colloquium

The next Research Colloquium will be held next Friday 8th April starting at 1.30pm in G4. The program of presenters is as follows:

Time Presenter Presentation Type Title
1.30 – 2.15pm Anthony Rees Faculty Presentation A Father’s Lament Doubly Received: David’s cry with Robert Alter and Nigel Butterley
2.15 – 3.00pm Teresa Parish PhD Presentation Emerging research into interpreting practices in churches and other religious contexts
3.00 – 3.45pm John Fitz-Herbert PhD Research discussion Saying Sorry to Indigenous Australians: implications for Roman Catholic liturgy

Anthony Rees Anthony-Rees A Father’s Lament Doubly Received: David’s cry with Robert Alter and Nigel Butterley
David’s lament in 2 Sam 18:33, on hearing of Absalom’s death, has been an extremely popular text for composers to set to music. The traditional English language settings utilise a text that begins ‘When David Heard’, though these words are absent from the 1611 King James Bible, and the 1560 Geneva bible, and no other extant text supports this rendering. However, a cluster of some thirteen settings of the text in the seventeenth century which appropriated this translation established somewhat of a ‘tradition.’ Settings through to the twenty-first century have continued to utilise this text, with one prominent composer assuming that the textual tradition came from the King James Bible. However, Australian composer Nigel Butterley has produced a setting which makes use of Robert Alter’s translation of the David story. Rather than focus on the single verse, Butterley redacts four chapters of Alter’s translation into a comprehensible narrative, punctuated by the refrain ‘Beni Avshalom. Beni, veni Avshalom’ which appears three times, and the full lament which occurs on the last two occasions.
This paper examines Butterley’s appropriation of Alter’s translation, and the musical vocabulary which is employed in conveying this deeply moving text. Interested as it is in issues of interpretation, it reveals Butterley as a both sensitive and powerful reader of scripture.

Teresa Parish teresa-parish-postgrad-seminar Emerging research into interpreting practices in churches and other religious contexts
There is a growing awareness of the crucial role that interpreter’s play in religious settings. Currently, the research being conducted is within the disciplines of linguistics, translation and intercultural studies. Research conducted within translation and interpreting studies has so far reported on church interpreting occurring among Methodists in the Gambia (Karlik 2010), Pentecostals in Finland (Hokkanen 2012), Protestants in Korea (Shin 2013), Pentecostals in Kenya (Biamah 2013), and Protestants in Turkey (Balci Tison 2016). This paper examines the major trends emerging in research regarding interpreting practices in church contexts. It will also demonstrate how a theological and homiletical approach will add to the inter-disciplinary discourse already taking place.

John Fitz-Herbert Saying Sorry to Indigenous Australians: implications for Roman Catholic liturgy
In this presentation, I will describe select aspects of thesis research I have been undertaking over several years. My working title has been: ‘Saying Sorry to Indigenous Australians: implications for Roman Catholic liturgy’.

My aim has been to establish a dialogue between the annual civic celebration in Australia of National Sorry Day held on 26 May and the annual liturgical celebration within the Roman Catholic Church in Australia of National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Sunday on the first Sunday of July.

I have had the following thesis: to what extent might the annual civic commemoration of National Sorry Day in Australia contribute to the Roman Catholic Church in Brisbane, Australia, re-envisioning its annual liturgical celebration of National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (NATSI) Sunday with a view to furthering processes of reconciliation between indigenous Australians and non-indigenous Australians?

My aim has been to facilitate a conversation between three partners (experience, culture, and tradition), and I have asked several guiding questions:
1. What is reconciliation? What contributes to it and what diminishes it?
2. Who needs reconciliation? For what reasons?
3. How does ritual contribute to the negotiation of reconciliation? How can it inhibit or diminish reconciliation?

Since undertaking this project, I have become more aware of the significance of the civic rituals of Welcome to country and Acknowledgement of country. I’m wondering how these may find a place in future research.

This short presentation will seek comment, critique and suggestions from the group with a view to formulating are new research question for the DMin thesis.

HDR Students are reminded that their participation in the Research Colloquiums is a critical component of their candidature and that apologies should be sent to me at [email protected]

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