October Research Colloquium

The next Research Colloquium is being held this Friday 12 October starting at 1.30pm in G3. The program is as follows:

 

Time Presenter Presentation Type Title
1.30pm – 2.15pm William Emilsen Guest Presentation Writing Black Biography
2.15pm – 3.00pm Michael Earl PhD Presentation Entrusted with the Gospel: Towards a New Testament Account of Trust Pertaining to the Church’s Ministry
3.00pm – 3.45pm Charles Tupu PhD Research Proposal Fa’aola Fanua: The Role of a Public Theology in Taking Care of Customary Land (fanua faa-le-aganuu)

 

William Emilsen               Writing Black Biography

This paper presents historical challenges involved in composing a biography of Rev. Charles Harris, the founder and first president of the Uniting Aboriginal and Islander Christian Congress (UAICC).

 

Michael Earl                       Entrusted with the Gospel: Towards a New Testament Account of Trust Pertaining to the Church’s Ministry

Texts in the New Testament that speak about the exercise of ministry/leadership in the earliest Christian communities are employed to inform theologies of ministry. These texts speak of emerging roles in the early church and provide biblical warrant for the development of enduring offices. In this paper, however, I suggest that a question needs to be answered before consideration of such texts is made. In calling the church to its vocation of proclaiming the Gospel to the world, God entrusts ministry into the church’s hands. For the church to exercise its calling it must understand the nature of the trust. To this end, I will draw on Phil 2:1–11 to offer one biblical account of trust. I will contend that ministry is a divine trust given to the whole people of God, with a uniquely theological shape, that may thereafter take on more specific forms for the sake of the church’s life and witness.

 

Charles Tupu                      Fa’aola Fanua: The Role of a Public Theology in Taking Care of Customary Land (fanua faa-le-aganuu)

On 16 December 2017 more than 300 protesters marched on Parliament in Apia. The burden of their complaint was legislation that enabled customary land to be registered for private ownership and sale, a policy in sharp contrast to the traditional practice of land being held collectively. As a contemporary issue in the Samoan public domain this issue lends itself to the expression of a public theology conceived within the experience of the Methodist Church of Samoa. This paper builds upon the pioneering work of Mercy Ah-Siu Maliko and her public theology based on domestic abuse. Fa’aola Fanua is a Samoan expression that works on several levels. It can refer to a person who takes care of the land or to the bush knife (aga’ese) that is used to cultivate and protect the land (fanua). The word Fa’aola can also mean “to save or to give life,” and, by extension, to the God who saves. This paper will examine how a public theology based on fa’aola fanua might engage Samoan tradition (fa’a-Samoa) and the particular issue of land ownership.

 

HDR Students are reminded that their participation in the Research Colloquiums is a critical component of their candidature and that apologies should be sent to me at [email protected]

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