September Research Colloquium

Dear All,

The next Research Colloquium is being held next Friday, 14 September starting at 1.30pm in G2. The program is as follows:

Time Presenter Presentation Type Title
1.30pm – 2.15pm David Neville (Head of School) Faculty Presentation Paul—Apostle of Peace? Probing a Tension in Paul’s Theological and Moral Vision
2.15pm – 3.00pm Adam White Guest Presentation Paul’s Absence from Corinth as Voluntary Exile: Reading 2 Corinthians 1:1-2:13 and 7:5-16 as a Letter from Exile

Paul—Apostle of Peace? Probing a Tension in Paul’s Theological and Moral Vision

Focusing first on an interpretive conundrum in Romans 12–13, this seminar paper identifies and probes a point of tension in Paul’s theology and ethics. Simply stated, that tension point is the apparent discrepancy between Paul’s peaceable theology and ethics in light of the historic Christ-event and his occasionally articulated expectation of eschatological vengeance. Much of the seminar paper is devoted to outlining reasons for viewing Paul the apostle as the earliest Christian theologian of peace, thereby casting in sharp relief the question of whether Paul’s overall soteriology is theologically and morally coherent. Finally, is Paul an apostle of peace?

Paul’s Absence from Corinth as Voluntary Exile: Reading 2 Corinthians 1:1-2:13 and 7:5-16 as a Letter from Exile

In the discussion over the unity of 2 Corinthians, scholars have noted the apparent self-contained unit found in 2 Cor 1:1–2:13 and 7:5–16. Those who argue for the unity of the letter see 2 Cor 2:14–7:4 as a digression in Paul’s thought; while those advocating for a partition of the letter see this as a separate letter altogether. In either case, what is clear is that the section addresses a falling out between Paul and the Corinthians. It is my contention in this paper that Paul has taken himself into voluntary exile, a common practice when disputes threatened to erode the community. Further, I contend that this section of Second Corinthians functions as a letter from exile in the same style as writings from Demosthenes, Cicero, Ovid, and Seneca.

HDR Students are reminded that their participation in the Research Colloquiums is a critical component of their candidature and that apologies should be sent to me at [email protected]

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